Do you suffer from drivers’ foot?

When you drive a car, your foot may cramp, and at that moment, you may suspect that you are suffering from what is called “driver’s foot.” Other signs and symptoms include discomfort in the heel, big toe, and upper part of the foot. “Driver’s foot” usually causes pain in the big toe, above the big toe, or in the foot near the big toe. The pain usually occurs on long drives or when standing in lines for long periods of time. Driving clearly contributes to the driver’s foot. This can affect both experienced and occasional drivers. Because drivers are forced to keep their leg in the same position for long periods of time, rush hour traffic can make the pain worse.

These overuse complaints usually occur when the foot touches the pedal. Constant pressure on the pedal can worsen the pain, lead to bursitis (inflammation of the fluid-filled sacs between the toe joints), or even crush the toe bones.

In addition, the type of shoes you wear while driving can cause leg and foot pain. When driving, your heel usually rests on the ground, which can cause pressure points and heel pain. The likelihood that you will have pain can increase when you step on the gas pedal or brake. Changing the shoes, you wear while driving can help significantly reduce heel pain.

There are several ways to reduce foot discomfort. The first is certainly to change your seating position. The ankle will be stressed when you pedal if you move the seat too close to the pedals. If you move the seat too far down, the pressure on the back of the heel increases. Because seat position is so important, take some time to make sure your feet are in the right place before you start riding.

Plan rest breaks into your itinerary for long trips. Take frequent breaks while driving and stretch and flex your feet and ankles when you get out of the vehicle. To promote blood circulation, you can even take off your shoes and massage your own feet.

It is very important to change and use the right footwear during long trips, because it will not strain the foot.

N.D.
20.09.2022.